Celebration of Dutch master Nicolaes Maes at the National Gallery

    I admit I hadn’t heard of Nicholaes Maes, reportedly Rembrandt’s favourite pupil, so I was very keen to discover his work at the National Gallery at the beginning of March 2020, just before lockdown. The mid-seventeenth century must have been an exciting time for the young Maes, who left his home town of…

Titian: Love, Desire, Death extended at the National Gallery

When COVID-19 forced the doors of the National Gallery to shut on 18 March 2020, it meant that the long planned, eagerly anticipated, once in a lifetime exhibition Titian: Love, Desire, Death also had to close after being open for just three days. Universally acclaimed Titian: Love, Desire, Death brings together the artist’s epic series…

My favourite things: the museum gift shop

I was often denied a visit to the museum giftshop as a child. Hence, now I’m a fully-fledged grown up,  I have a rather over-enthusiastic fondness for such places, something which my friend and co-founder of ArtMuseLondon, Nick, finds rather amusing. I’m not sure why my parents steered me away from the giftshop at the…

Culture in a time of coronavirus

2020 got off to a flying start, culture-wise, with the Royal Academy’s remarkable Picasso on Paper exhibition, and our quartet of reviewers were eagerly looking forward to a busy year of exhibitions, concerts and opera. On one trip to London, I managed to fit in not one but three exhibitions in a single day –…

Soprano Romaniw Celebrates Slavic Repertoire with ‘Arion’

  Natalya Romaniw’s star has been shining bright on the operatic stage for the past five years as her creamy soprano voice continues to draw an ever increasing legion of fans. A Daily Telegraph critic suggested in February this year that Romaniw was the next Netrebko of her generation. At Opera Holland Park last season,…

“32 Masterpieces” – Jonathan Biss | Beethoven the Complete Piano Sonatas

For American pianist Jonathan Biss, Beethoven has been a near-constant companion for almost his entire life. He has been playing and writing about the 32 Piano Sonatas and has spent nearly ten years recording Beethoven’s sonatas. Now he is performing all the sonatas over a nine-month period, with concerts at London’s Wigmore Hall and in…

A kind of blue: Léon Spilliaert at the RA

Last year the disquieting images of Felix Vallotton filled the Sackler Gallderies of the Royal Academy of Arts (read ArtMuseLondon’s review here). This spring, another little-known artist, Belgian Léon Spilliaert is represented, in this the first major exhibition of his work in the UK. Like Vallotton world, Spilliaert’s is unsettling, but for different reasons. Plagued…

Hockney at his most intimate and honest

David Hockney: Drawing from Life – a magnificent, intimate overview of Hockney’s oeuvre and imagination as a master draughtsman and also a meditation on friendship, change and the ageing process

French Impressions at the British Museum

  The British Museum’s new French Impressions show was several floors up in room 90, around the back of the museum. I’ve become quite accustomed to coming here for the BM’s print shows, for, for one thing, the BM benefits from an impressive print archive – admired the world over. The last exhibition I attended here,…