Walter Sickert Unsettles and Enchants at Tate Britain Retrospective

Walter Sickert is a bit of an enigma. Brilliant certainly, rather weird, probably. Author, Patricia Cornwell, wrote a book about him, claiming that he was the Jack the Ripper. She is not the first writer to associate Sickert with the infamous murderer. Other writers postulate that Sickert was the Ripper’s assistant. What is undeniable, is that Sickert…

Life Between Islands Lights up Tate Britain

Life Between Islands at Tate Britain is a large show, so give yourself time to peruse the wealth of Caribbean-British art from the 1950s to the present. The exhibition opens with the old guard artists, who came to settle in Britain between the late 1940s and 1970s.  Aubrey Williams’s expressionist art grabbed my attention in the first…

Hogarth and Europe. A rewarding show at Tate Britain

               Hogarth’s ‘Marriage-A-La-Mode 2 – The Tête à Tête 1743 I am always happy to revisit Hogarth’s work. His irreverent paintings and prints seem more alive today in our age of political correctness.  Hogarth and Europe at Tate Britain contains sixty Hogarth works, some of them new to the…

Boakye’s Show at Tate Britain Alluring and Enigmatic

    The Matters 2016   Of Ghanaian descent, Lynette Yiadom-Boakye was born in London in 1977. Now into her fourth decade, she has already achieved so much as an artist. Her oil paintings are to be found in museum collections across the world and since 2015 she has had solo shows in London, Munich, Basel…

Turner’s Modern World at War

Tate Britain is home to the majority of J.M.Turner’s total output due to his bequest to the institution in 1851 .  Three hundred oil paintings and many thousands of watercolours and sketches, have, over the years,  either travelled to other galleries, been archived, or have featured in the Clore Gallery’s ever-changing displays. Turner’s Modern World is Tate Britain’s…

“a wonderful view of a revised history of British art”

The guide, reflecting the displays in the Tate Britain, gives us a wonderful view of a revised history of British art which includes the contribution of artists of the diaspora and women artists and presents plural perspectives of Britain and its diverse cultures.

Over the Top with Everything They’d Got: British Baroque at Tate Britain

The new show at Tate Britain, British Baroque: Power and Illusion starts in another epoch when our relationship with Europe was a tad strained, let us say, and ends at the point when a German prince who spoke not a word of English was invited – if not begged – to take over the English throne. You’d almost think Tate Britain had timed this show deliberately.

Edward Burne-Jones at Tate Britain

It feels like the right moment to reacquaint oneself with the work of Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones. In our uncertain times, escapism provides relief and comfort, and when you enter EBJ’s dreamscape world of myth and fantasy, you move beyond the petty preoccupations and ugly politics of our world now. This is the first large show…

All too human curating at Tate Britain

Tate Britain’s new exhibition ‘All Too Human: Bacon, Freud and a century of painting life’ is about art based on everyday experience. A very British preoccupation, you might think, if the story of twentieth century painting in this country is anything to go by. Unfortunately, this interesting premise is marred by some very questionable curating decisions,…

London through French eyes

Impressionists in London: French Artists in Exile, 1870-1904 Tate Britain, London. 2 November 2017 – 7 May 2018 1871. France is ravaged by the Franco-Prussian war. Paris is under siege and rife with insurrection. Thousands flee the country in search of refuge and a new life away from war and revolution. Amongst those that fled…